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     Governor Andrew Cuomo has named members of a Bridge Design Aesthetic Team  that will evaluate proposals from three competing  construction teams bidding to build the new Tappan Zee Bridge.   His more prominent choices include artist and sculpture, Jeffrey Koons, the Director of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas P. Campbell,  architect Richard Meier, who designed the Getty Center in Los Angeles and Keith Brownlie, an internationally acclaimed bridge designer.
 
     The panel will work under the auspices of the New York State Council of the Arts, and "...will review proposed bridge designs as well as assist local community leaders and transportation experts in the evaluation process," according to a news release from the New York State Thruway Authority. .
        
     Governor Cuomo called the panel, a "different kind of review team. "It's a team that combines technical experts, architectural experts, local experts as well as artists to ensure the new bridge is the best choice and fit for the region."  Proposals submitted by the three construction groups will be analyzed for their "technical quality in conjunction with their pricing information,"  to identify those that "offer the best value to New York State.

     The team of artists and architects will provide assistance to the team of community leaders, and experts that will make its recommendations to the Thruway Authority.   Tarrytown Mayor Drew Fixell has appointed a member of the Village's Planning Board, David Aukland to represent the village on the selection panel.  Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino has named County Department of Planning Commissioner Edward Buroughs to represent the County. .
       
     Among the criteria listed within the Thruway Authority's earlier Requests For Proposals are pricing, bridge structure and design,  investment in future transit options, traffic management, environmental requirements, the construction plan, anticipated lifespan and the experience of the design-build team.  
 
     As for the new bridges' appearance , Cuomo told an Albany news conference that, . "We want an attractive design that enhances the region." He saw the bridge as, "...a big sign of progress, a big act of  progress for the state." He referred to the past years of tedious studies and half-starts on the bridge project, as "...a symbol of dysfunction in government,' adding that the bridge will be "...a symbol of what we are trying to do."   
 
     The review panel is expected to make a decision this fall as to which of the three bidders it recommends to the Thruway Authority which will make the final decision. The governor is pushing for a quick start-up of the project, possibly before the year's end.
 
     The New York State Thruway Authority envisions the new bridge as consisting of two parallel structures,  each carrying traffic one way. It will stretch from it Rockland County connection to the present Tarrytown bridge entrance with either a short or long span, using either an arch or Cable-Stayed option, and will require the installation of piles, pile caps and other structures, according to the Thruway Authority's requirements.  It is to provide lanes for rapid bus transit.  
 
     While unease remains among  neighborhoods near the construction sites on both sides of the  bridge, the state  has continued to schedule a series of meetings with residents to hear about and allay their concerns about the bridge work. Releasing the Final Environmental Study in July, the Governor stated that, "We are making every effort to limit negative impacts on residents and the environment.”  He promised that construction activities would be monitored to ensure that pledge.

     The bridge construction is expected to bring 45 thousand jobs to the region. The state is seeking federal assistant to cover at least $2 billion of the anticipated $5.2 billion total cost. Bridge tolls are expected to climb on the new span, with some assessments ranging up to $14 for per passage, but with lower rates for regular commuters and EZpass holders.

     Governor Andrew Cuomo has named members of a Bridge Design Aesthetic Team that will evaluate proposals from three competing  construction teams bidding to build the new Tappan Zee Bridge.   His more prominent choices include artist and sculpture, Jeffrey Koons, the Director of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas P. Campbell,  architect Richard Meier, who designed the Getty Center in Los Angeles and Keith Brownlie, an internationally acclaimed bridge designer.
 
     The panel will work under the auspices of the New York State Council of the Arts, and "...will review proposed bridge designs as well as assist local community leaders and transportation experts in the evaluation process," according to a news release from the New York State Thruway Authority. .
        
     Governor Cuomo called the panel, a "different kind of review team. "It's a team that combines technical experts, architectural experts, local experts as well as artists to ensure the new bridge is the best choice and fit for the region."  Proposals submitted by the three construction groups will be analyzed for their "technical quality in conjunction with their pricing information,"  to identify those that "offer the best value to New York State.

     The team of artists and architects will provide assistance to the team of community leaders, and experts that will make its recommendations to the Thruway Authority.   Tarrytown Mayor Drew Fixell has appointed a member of the Village's Planning Board, David Aukland to represent the village on the selection panel.  Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino has named County Department of Planning Commissioner Edward Buroughs to represent the County. .
       
     Among the criteria listed within the Thruway Authority's earlier Requests For Proposals are pricing, bridge structure and design,  investment in future transit options, traffic management, environmental requirements, the construction plan, anticipated lifespan and the experience of the design-build team.  
 
     As for the new bridges' appearance , Cuomo told an Albany news conference that, . "We want an attractive design that enhances the region." He saw the bridge as, "...a big sign of progress, a big act of  progress for the state." He referred to the past years of tedious studies and half-starts on the bridge project, as "...a symbol of dysfunction in government,' adding that the bridge will be "...a symbol of what we are trying to do."   
 
     The review panel is expected to make a decision this fall as to which of the three bidders it recommends to the Thruway Authority which will make the final decision. The governor is pushing for a quick start-up of the project, possibly before the year's end.
 
     The New York State Thruway Authority envisions the new bridge as consisting of two parallel structures,  each carrying traffic one way. It will stretch from it Rockland County connection to the present Tarrytown bridge entrance with either a short or long span, using either an arch or Cable-Stayed option, and will require the installation of piles, pile caps and other structures, according to the Thruway Authority's requirements.  It is to provide lanes for rapid bus transit.  
 
     While unease remains among  neighborhoods near the construction sites on both sides of the  bridge, the state  has continued to schedule a series of meetings with residents to hear about and allay their concerns about the bridge work. Releasing the Final Environmental Study in July, the Governor stated that, "We are making every effort to limit negative impacts on residents and the environment.”  He promised that construction activities would be monitored to ensure that pledge.

     The bridge construction is expected to bring 45 thousand jobs to the region. The state is seeking federal assistant to cover at least $2 billion of the anticipated $5.2 billion total cost. Bridge tolls are expected to climb on the new span, with some assessments ranging up to $14 for per passage, but with lower rates for regular commuters and EZpass holders.

Are you crazy about your beautiful, amazing unique home?  Do you think you have the coolest house on the block?  Do you think your house could win a competition?  Would you like a chance to show it off the world and have it possibly featured in a national magazine?

The casting producers for TLC's Four Houses wants to hear from YOU!!!

Submit your name, location and contact information along with photos of four different rooms in your home and a picture of you and your family to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Tell them about you and why you think your house could win on Four Houses!

They are also looking for the best decorated Halloween Homes in Sleepy Hollow country.  (Send photos from last year).

They hope to begin shooting on this project in mid-October so don't wait.  Contact them now!

For more information, you may also call Sherry at (818) 666-3606.

Court Decision Opens Way For GM Site Development

Thursday, 13 September 2012 11:47 Published in Latest News

      The  more than year-long legal obstacle that had slowed further movement to redevelop the vacated 96 acre GM site along Sleepy Hollow riverfront is over.  State Supreme Court Justice James Hubert has  issued a decision dismissing neighboring Tarrytown's lawsuit contending that the mixed-use plan for the development approved by Sleepy Hollow did not properly gauge the environmental impact, most pointedly the additional traffic its size would create.  
 
    Prior to the lawsuit, GM had been given the green light by Sleepy Hollow to sell the land to a developer by issuing a special permit, approving  an earlier court decision that allowed 1,177 residential units as well as shops. restaurants, office space and a 140 room hotel to be built on the site. Tarrytown contended that the density of the development had to be reduced by at least 40% to alleviate the potential traffic flow. Sleepy Hollow responded that its plans dealt adequately with the traffic problem.  

      In filing the suit, Tarrytown had stated it was not objecting to the redevelopment of the site, " but rather the objection is to the scope of the site."  It's response to the court's dismissal of its case against Sleepy Hollow and GM was brief: "The Mayor and Board of Trustees are, of course, disappointed in the court’s determination, and will be reviewing with legal counsel all of the Village’s options. At this time, no decision has been made as to whether to pursue further actions."

    "This is good news for us,"  Sleepy Hollow Mayor Ken Wray, declared.  "The court's decision supports Sleepy Hollow's review of the project as comprehensive and thorough," Mayor Wray added. "With this news, we are poised to proceed with the most exciting project the village has seen in a long time. "The next phase of our history will see the realization of much-needed tax dollars for the village, County, town and school district, create 1,800 jobs for the region, build infrastructure for the entire village, and bring an infusion of new businesss to the area," the Mayor said.
             .
    This past spring, GM hinted that the lawsuit was likely holding up a sale of the property to one of several developers with whom it had undertaken serious discussions.  A GM spokesperson told The Hudson Independent that, "We're engaged in a Request for Proposal (RFP) process to identify a purchaser/developer of the property." As for the lawsuit, "It may be slowing the redevelopment process slightly, based on feedback we have received from some of the prospective developers," the spokesperson added. "Site development will begin as soon as a developer is chosen and closed on the purchase."

   "We are looking forward to working with the developer selected by GM for the project,"  Mayor Wray said.

About The Hudson Independent and Its Mission

Tuesday, 11 September 2012 10:58 Published in About Us

About The Hudson Independent and Its Mission



“You are judged by the company you keep,” goes an old adage that holds true today.  Balance and objectivity in reporting, and factual coverage of diverse topics, as well as our concern for the communities that we serve have brought distinction to The Hudson Independent. Judged by the reaction of the newspaper’s readership, and plaudits from civic groups and a professional journalism organization, advertisers on the pages of The Hudson Independent are in good company.



Into its seventh year of publication, the newspaper has adhered to its mission of accurately informing residents of Irvington, Tarrytown, Sleepy Hollow, Scarborough on Hudson, Pocantico Hills and Ardsley on Hudson, about the wide range of activities that affect their daily lives. Impartial coverage of topics that range from government, schools, real estate and business, to sports, social events and personalities, have made the newspaper an important and trusted source of information to its nearly 30,000 readers in the rivertowns.  The newspaper’s free, guaranteed circulation of 13,700 copies reaching every household and business as well as important drop-off locations in the three villages have gained a wide recognition for The Hudson Independent within all of the diverse demographic and ethnic groups that make up the region.



The Hudson Independent is the only local newspaper covering Irvington, Tarrytown and Sleepy Hollow that carries a comprehensive monthly listings of events, giving it a long shelf-life as a reference for its readers. Tuned to the needs of the communities, the newspaper gives voice to its readers on important topics in columns such as “Point-Counterpoint,” and “Letters-to-the-Editor.” Its news reporting is free of bias and the paper’s opinions are expressed only within its editorial page.



The newspaper has won an award from the New York Press Association, and praise as the 
2008 “Organization of the Year” from the Rotary Club of the Tarrytowns as well as proclamations from the three villages and the Chambers of Commerce for its dedication and commitment to those communities. It is a member of the villages’ Chambers of Commerce.



Begun through the financial support of 75 concerned local shareholders with a vision of bringing forthright, honest journalism to the villages, The Hudson Independent pledges to uphold that mission in the months and years to come. We think that makes very good company.



 

Our Awards

  • New York Press Association

  • The Rotary Club of the Tarrytowns

  • The Irvington Chamber of Commerce
  • Sleepy Hollow-Tarrytown Chamber of Commerce

  • Villages of Tarrytown and Sleepy Hollow




 

The Hudson Independent
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Tarrytown, NY 10591


914-631-6311


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Tarrytown Trustees Okay Music on Main Street

Friday, 07 September 2012 20:13 Published in Latest News

An amendment to Tarrytown's village regulations passed by its Board of Trustees early this month will allow solo musicians to play along a stretch of Main Street's sidewalks on certain days of the week.   The Trustees voted unanimously to permit up to four  single music-makers, spaced 100 yards apart,  to entertain passers-by from  Broadway to Baylis Court, and they can make their music only on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays between the hours of  5p.m. and 9 p.m.  Musicians will require permits issued by the village.
            The elimination of a ban on such activities was pursued by the Tarrytown Merchants Association who saw it as an amenity for shoppers along the village's business district. It was also pushed by Christopher Reising the serenading jazz guitarist who had been entertaining folks on the sidewalk at 51 Main Street for a few years until a year ago when both the authorities and Reising realized he was breaking the law when another musician had been barred from playing on the sidewalk.
            Reising bolstered his plea for a change in the law, (“No person shall participate in any parade, exhibition or the playing of musical instruments upon the streets of the village unless authorization has first been received by the Board of Trustees”), by amassing hundreds of signatures on a petition he presented at the Trustee hearing. Reising has continued to play at Chamber of Commerce events and within restaurants and shops.   
            While Reising objected to certain restrictions in the amendment,  particularly the ban on amplification, the Board, led by Mayor Drew Fixell, decided to pass the rule change and possibly "tweak" it in the future to meet specific requests.  Village Administrator Michael Blau noted that he had met with Reising about the law and also consulted with other villages to determine how they handle rules regarding sidewalk musicians.  A requirement that musicians renew permits annually is expected to be altered to a two-year renewable at a future Trustee meeting. The cost of the permit, $10. As the amendment now stands, the musicians are not permitted to accept tips. And drums are not acceptable to add to the beat.
              Reising, in addition to playing the guitar, and singing, also has mastered the flute, and piano and was instrumental in the development of the Karaoke in the United States and Japan.

The village of Sleepy Hollow will hold their Annual Street Fair Saturday, September 8th from 10am – 5pm. During this event the Sleepy Hollow Police Department and PBA will have a booth outside of police headquarters featuring New York Life Insurance Company representatives completing Child Identification cards. They are laminated and given to the parent. The card will include a photo, finger prints, medical info and other pertinent information necessary for identification or emergencies. This information would be of immense assistance to a police department if a child goes missing or for a parent to have for any emergency. This process is free of charge. Also, anyone with an adult child or a parent with a disability or with Alzheimer’s, is welcome to have this completed. Upon completing the necessary paperwork, the process takes 3-5 minutes.
 
NOTE: Beekman Avenue will be closed to traffic between Route 9 and Pocantico Street from about 7am to 6pm.

Sundial Farm Offers Unique Indoor, Outdoor Furnishings

Friday, 07 September 2012 10:36 Published in Business

 Spring is here, and what better way to celebrate rebirth, renewal, color and warmth than with a visit to Ossining’s Sundial Farm and The Barn at Sundial Farm? This 18-acre property has been a farm since the 1700s, with the original house, blacksmith cottage and magnificent barns still in glorious condition since their construction in 1780.  Now, visitors can wander through three picturesque barns, with original chestnut hand-hewn beams, and horse stalls brimming with antiques. Or amble throughout the property, now a riot of color popping from flowering shrubs, hanging baskets, and Japanese tree peonies. Whether you are looking to fill your garden or your flower boxes, or searching for an antique or collectible wedding gift, Sundial has it all. 

   This unique combination of indoor and outdoor furnishings came about in the best possible way – through friendship. Penny and Bill Hawkeye, owners of Sundial Farm, since 1973, raised their seven children here. Their friends, Tim and Diane Arnold, opened the antique barn on the property two years ago, “on a whim.” While the Hawkeyes had spent decades making things grow, the Arnolds had been “collecting great stuff,” according to Tim, for 30 years. After selling their home in Westchester and putting their wide-ranging collections in storage, they didn’t know what to do with everything. Over a glass of wine one night with their good friends, the Hawkeyes, the idea for The Barn at Sundial Farm was born. And, three weeks later, they were open for business. “It may have started as a whim,” Tim conceded, “but it’s become a passion.” 

    “It’s our creative outlet,” acknowledged his wife Diane, “and people tell us we have a good eye for these things.” 

   Both couples have had long professional lives before embarking on these post-retirement careers. Penny rose up the ladder in Manhattan’s advertising world, becoming “Advertising Woman of the Year in 2003.” Bill was an ad agency art director and urban landscaper, who designed former Mayor John Lindsay’s first vest-pocket parks in Harlem, Red Hook and the Lower East Side. 

   Tim Arnold is a 35-year advertising industry veteran, ad consultant, and columnist; Diane was a market researcher for 20 years.  Now both couples share the pleasure of making a beautiful, historic spot into something they can share with the wider world. 

   The Hawkeye home was the original 18th century inn and stagecoach stop where men enjoyed a few beers, while women retired to the upstairs bedrooms to rest. A blacksmith’s house, now home to Penny and Bill’s son and his family, sits alongside an entrance driveway, the original 250-year-old road.  Legend has it that a cave on the property was visited by the wandering, 1800s Leatherman.

Bill Hawkey’s “stick house” at Sundial Farm, filled with flowering annuals and perennials.   Bill’s 1973 book, Living with Plants, became an instant success; 40 years later his horticultural expertise is clearly visible- filling hoop houses, the grounds and gardens with hundreds of plant varieties. Sundial’s specialty is perennials, now ready to go in the ground; you’ll find native species, new cultivars, deer resistant and drought resistant varieties, plus bee and butterfly collections. Organic vegetable starts are plentiful: tomatoes, cucumbers, kale, beets, squash and baby greens and so much more. Right now, geraniums, fulsome hydrangeas, colorful petunia baskets, pansies, impatiens, lobelia bacopa, and clematis are all in bloom. Soon, the Hawkeye’s garden will provide farm fresh produce for visitors along with local maple syrup, and preserves; there will be pumpkins in the fall. Four hives are deep into honey production, and 100 recently planted apple trees are well on their way to becoming a “pick your own” experience that will enhance your Sundial farm visit in the future. 

   Take time to marvel at “Bill’s stick house” a portico he designed and built himself from 2 fallen cedar trees and thin willow branches. His inspiration, he explained, was  “the Parthenon.” The property also features one of Westchester’s most magical birch groves, worth wandering through as you contemplate what to buy from the farm or the barns. 

   In the barns, the impeccable, wonderfully eclectic taste of the Arnolds is on display, not only the collection itself, but the thoughtful yet whimsical layout of the rooms themselves.  Where else in Westchester can you find Mid-Century, Modern, Arts & Crafts, Art Deco, contemporary and American vintage furniture artfully presented in historically preserved barns? All three barns, including nine horse stalls, are filled with a remarkable range of home furnishings, lighting fixtures, ceramics, glassware, and decorative items for home and garden. Thanks to the taste, creativity and perseverance of Tim and Diane, the Sundial barns have been transformed into rooms that delight the eye with imaginative furniture displays dramatically enhanced by jewelry, vintage materials, and accessories of all kinds.

   The Arnolds travel in winter, and have become serious “pickers” – often seeing the value of items that others can’t and zeroing in on distinctive quality, whether antique or modern

   “We have as much fun installing and presenting items as anything,” noted Tim. Visitors to The Barn can walk through room after room multiple times and not see everything there is to see, so repeat visits give your eye a chance to adjust.  Thanks to Diane’s meticulous attention to detail, displays highlight color and uniqueness, which may be why interior decorators and designers have become followers of The Barn.

  Modern Calphalon cookware, a hand-made Spanish copper cataplana, serving trays from a wide-range of eras, cocktail glasses and shakers from Deco to 50’s kitsch- it’s all here. Furniture designers represented include Eames, Knoll, Saarinen, Miller, Thonet, Stickley and van der Rohde. Victorian rockers, a wicker wheelchair, cabinets in all manner of designs create a lively, unpredictable venue for antique lovers and spirited buyers. 

   If you are curious as to how this side-by-side arrangement of farm and antique barn looks, you can see Bill’s stick house, plus historical photos, along with an array of Sundial’s seasonal perennials, annuals, herbs, ground covers and vegetables, at: www.sundialfarm.us. Penny’s botanical photography is justly becoming well-known, with gallery shows in Piermont and Manhattan helping to spread the word. For an additional eye-popping treat, visit her website:pennyhawkeyphotography.com and see for yourself. As for the barns, be sure to check out: www.thebarnsale.us for a full visual experience and individual photographs of The Barn’s vast collection.

   But nothing is really an adequate substitute for a personal visit to Sundial – experiencing the hard work and passion born of four collaborative friends with active imaginations and many different skill sets can be as renewing as spring itself. 

 

IF YOU GO:

 

Sundial Farm

1311 Kitchawan Road, Ossining 

(just off the Taconic Parkway, 

   on Route 134)

(914) 391-5965

Open April through November

Tues. - Sun. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

 

The Barn at Sundial Farm

(917) 579-8373

Open April through November

Thurs. - Sun. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

TZ Bridge Public Meeting Weds 9/12

Thursday, 06 September 2012 10:29 Published in Latest News
PUBLIC MEETING
TAPPAN ZEE HUDSON RIVER CROSSING PROJECT
 
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 7:00 PM
TARRYTOWN SENIOR CENTER
WEST MAIN STREET
 
Come hear representatives from the project team and the Governor’s Office speak about the Tappan Zee Bridge replacement project.

Tarrytown Public Hearing on Alarm Permits

Wednesday, 05 September 2012 11:19 Published in Government

PUBLIC NOTICE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Board of Trustees of the Village of Tarrytown will hold a public hearing on the 17th day of September, 2012, at 8 PM, in the Municipal Building, One Depot Plaza, Tarrytown, New York 10591, to hear and discuss a proposed amendment to the Code of the Village of Tarrytown, Chapter 76-3 entitled “Alarm user permits; application; fee; violations; denial or revocation,” to provide for renewals of alarm permits every two years as opposed to every year.

All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard.  Access to the meeting room is available to the elderly and the handicapped.  Signing is available for the hearing-impaired; a request must be made to the Village Clerk at least five days in advance of the meeting.

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES
OF THE VILLAGE OF TARRYTOWN
                                                         
DATED:  September 4, 2012

Contact:
Michael Blau, Village Administrator
Tarrytown Village Hall
One Depot Plaza
Tarrytown, New York 10591
[914] 631-1785

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